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TRENDING - 2020

Maintaining Professionalism In The Age of Black Death Is….A Lot

6/03/20 - Medium - Shenequa Golding

I just witnessed the lynching of a black man, but don’t worry Ted, I’ll have those deliverables to you end of day.


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Frank Rizzo Statue Is Removed In Philadelphia: 'It Is Finally Gone,' Mayor Says

6/03/20 - NPR - Bill Chappell

Workers removed a statue of Philadelphia's controversial former Mayor Frank Rizzo from its place of honor across from City Hall early Wednesday morning, finishing a job that protesters attempted to accomplish during recent demonstrations against police brutality.

In the 1970s, Rizzo famously told Philadelphia voters to "vote white." But on Wednesday, the City of Brotherly Love took down a memorial to a man who exploited its divisions.


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Confederate Monument Being Removed After Birmingham Mayor Vows To 'Finish The Job'

6/02/20 - NPR - Colin Dwyer

Piece by piece, authorities overnight began pulling down a five-story-tall monument to Confederate troops that has stood for more than a century in Birmingham, Ala.

By the time the workers paused Tuesday morning, little was left of a spire that had become a lightning rod for controversy in recent years and a focal point for local protesters outraged by George Floyd's death last week in Minneapolis.


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131-year-old Confederate statue removed from Alexandria intersection

6/02/20 - Patricia Sullivan

The Confederate statue “Appomattox,” which depicts a southern-facing Civil War soldier and has stood in an Alexandria intersection for 131 years, was removed Tuesday morning, a month earlier than planned.

Alexandria Mayor Justin Wilson (D) said the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which owns the statue, opted to remove the memorial a month ahead of schedule because of demonstrations nationwide in which segregation-era statues have been vandalized.


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Racism is a public health issue and 'police brutality must stop,' medical groups say

6/01/20 - CNN - Jacqueline Howard

As protests over George Floyd's death continue nationwide, several doctors' groups -- the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Association and American College of Physicians -- are emphasizing that racism is a public health issue and they're calling for police brutality to stop.


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Williams: America is battling two lethal adversaries, COVID-19 and racism. One is deadlier.

5/31/20 - Richmond Times Dispatch - MICHAEL PAUL WILLIAMS

The mood in the Museum District was curiously carefree on the sun-kissed afternoon following a night of arson and destruction.

Bubbles blew from a machine on the balcony of an apartment on Arthur Ashe Boulevard, across from the scorched United Daughters of the Confederacy building, where the message “BUILT ON OUR BACKS” was scrawled on the exterior.


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Voting Rights For Hundreds Of Thousands Of Felons At Stake In Florida Trial

4/27/20 - NPR - Daniel Rivero

A contentious federal civil rights trial is slated to begin Monday that will determine whether hundreds of thousands of people with felony convictions will be able to vote this fall in the swing state of Florida.

On one side of the case is Florida, along with a slew of other states supporting it from the sidelines.

On the other, hundreds of thousands of people who have completed their sentences but currently can't vote because of one thing they lack: money.


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Martin Luther King Jr.’s arrest record in Fulton County to be expunged

4/03/20 - The Atlanta Journal-Constitution By Ernie Suggs,

The last thing Martin Luther King Jr. ever wanted to do was get arrested.

So on Oct. 19, 1960, when he and dozens of young protesters were arrested in downtown Atlanta for participating in a sit-in demonstration at Rich’s department store, setting off a series of historic events, he was devastated.


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'Black Patriots' Were Heroes Of The Revolution — But Not The History Books

2/16/20 - NPR VPM - Leila Fadel

A new documentary, Black Patriots: Heroes of the Revolution, introduces us to heroes of the American Revolution who aren't typically found in history books. They are a writer, a double agent, a martyr and a soldier — and they are all black.

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is the executive producer. He is a Hall of Fame basketball player, writer, activist, and in 2016 the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom.


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Interrogating the Past

2/09/20 - Richmond Magazine - Rodrigo Arriaza

VCU, UR and other academic institutions probe their roles in perpetuating slavery and racial discrimination

The stolen bodies of men, women and children were cut apart for medical study, discarded in a 19th-century well and forgotten for more than 100 years. In late 2019, a ceremony marked the return of their remains to the medical campus at Virginia Commonwealth University after being stored at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History for 25 years.


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Slavery reparations seem impossible. In many places, they’re already happening

1/31/20 - The Washington Post - Thai Jones

Slavery reparations may be the single most divisive idea in American politics. Advocates have spent decades calling on the U.S. government to assess how such a policy could be implemented and to enact a law that might offer financial restitution to the descendants of enslaved people. But minds are made up — according to a recent Associated Press poll, 74 percent of African Americans now favor reparation payments, while 85 percent of whites oppose them — and Congress seems unlikely to take up the matter. A 30-year-old bill that would study the issue, H.R. 40, has never reached a vote. Hearings this past June brought Ta-Nehisi Coates, Danny Glover and other leading proponents to Capitol Hill, and every Democratic presidential candidate except Mike Bloomberg has backed at least studying the idea. The public remains unmoved.


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Journalist Gwen Ifill Honored With Black Heritage Forever Stamp

1/29/20 - NPR - Vanessa Romo

Gwen Ifill didn't want it to be a big deal.

The legendary journalist knew she'd served as a trailblazer for women and especially a beacon of what is professionally possible for women of color. But in an interview with The New York Times, she said she was eager for the days when it would not seem "like any breakthrough at all" for a black woman to be anchoring a national news program.

And yet, more than three years after her death, Ifill is still making breakthroughs. This time, on a stamp.


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'Like I wasn't there': climate activist Vanessa Nakate on being erased from a movement

1/29/20 - The Guardian - Kenya Evelyn

When Vanessa Nakate addressed a tweet to the Associated Press asking why she had been cropped out of a photo, it was out of curiosity. She didn’t think her question would ignite a firestorm of criticism and spark an international conversation on erasure and diversity within the environmental movement.

“When I saw the photo, I only saw part of my jacket. I was not on the list of participants. None of my comments from the press conference were included,” she said. “It was like I wasn’t even there.”


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How Jacob Lawrence Painted a Radical History of the American Struggle

1/28/20 - SMITHSONIANMAG.COM - Brigit Katz

Between 1949 and 1954, Jacob Lawrence made countless trips from his home in Brooklyn to the 135th Street Branch of the New York Public Library, where he scoured history books, letters, military reports and other documents for hidden stories that had shaped American history. By this point in time, Lawrence was “the most celebrated African American painter in America,” having risen to fame in the 1940s with multiple acclaimed series depicting black historical figures, the Great Migration and everyday life in Harlem. In May 1954, just as the Supreme Court ruled to desegregate public schools, the artist finally finished his research. He was ready to paint.


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Longview presentation shows how quilts served as 'Morse code' for slaves seeking freedom

1/25/20 - Longview News Journal - Ken Hedler khedler

Long before Navajo code talkers in World War II and the advent of secured phone lines and encrypted emails, some say, American slaves used quilts hung from windowsills and clotheslines as a signal to others to help them escape to the North for freedom.

These quilts contained symbols sewn into them. For instance, the North Star signaled for a slave to go north, a sailboat represented safe passage and bear claws told slaves to follow the bear trails into the mountains.

Pam Tucker's ancestors enslaved Wanda Tucker's. Together they confront effects of slavery.

1/25/20 - USA Today - ELIZABETH MONTGOMERY | ARIZONA REPUBLIC

PHOENIX – This week in Arizona, a descendant of slaves came face-to-face with a descendant of the family who enslaved her ancestors.

The takeaway? Before improvements can be made in race relations, we must understand the historically different experiences of white and black Americans.

"Not understanding ... what it means to live as an African American in this country was me. ... That's the experience for a lot of white people," said Pam Tucker, the descendant of a white Virginia slave owner.

On Thursday, Pam took the stage with Wanda Tucker, a descendant of a black slave family, at Rio Salado College in the Phoenix area.


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Q&A: Genevieve Siegel-Hawley on new book, school integration and Richmond Public Schools rezoning

1/17/20 - The Richmond Times Dispatch - JUSTIN MATTINGLY

Rather than give a classic speech as part of a lecture series she was asked to speak at in 2016, Genevieve Siegel-Hawley decided to share a personal reflection.

She wrote a letter to her daughter, Posey, about school desegregation, its history and its impacts today, an issue Siegel-Hawley got interested in as a Richmond student and teacher.


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Racist Housing Practices From The 1930s Linked To Hotter Neighborhoods Today

1/14/20 - NPR - Meg Anderson

In cities around the country, if you want to understand the history of a neighborhood, you might want to do the same thing you'd do to measure human health: Check its temperature.

That's what a group of researchers did, and they found that neighborhoods with higher temperatures were often the same ones subjected to discriminatory, race-based housing practices nearly a century ago.


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50 years after 'Black Manifesto,' religious groups again take up reparations

1/10/20 - Richmond Free Press - Matthew J. Cressler and Adelle M. Banks

On a Sunday morning in May 1969, as clergy processed into the sanctuary of New York’s august Riverside Church, civil rights activist James Forman vaulted into the pulpit to demand $500 million in reparations for the mistreatment of African-Americans from white churches and synagogues.


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Richmond students plead with lawmakers to fix their schools

1/09/20 - Channel 6 News - MATTHEW FULTZ,

A group of Richmond high school students are trying to make a difference for the children who will follow them.

Asia Goode is one of the students who on Wednesday evening called for state lawmakers to help improve school learning conditions.

"We're pushing for equitable funding for schools," Goode said.


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"A man dies when he refuses to stand up for that which is right. A man dies when he refuses to stand up for justice. A man dies when he refuses to take a stand for that which is true."
- Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.
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